April 2012

Church Door Intercom Systems

During the work week many churches keep their doors locked for security reasons even though church staff is there. Many churches also have a daycare center that must be secured to keep the children safe. As and example of why churches are locking their doors, on December 9, 2007, a gunman opened fire in the New Life Church injuring four people and killing 2.

Wireless Door IntercomThe problem then is that the people the church wants to let in can’t get in. Some sort of door intercom is needed so users can press a button and church staff can let them in.  The decision then is whether you can run wires to the front door or you need wireless. If wireless then the building construction plays a factor. If the church exterior is brick, stone, or some other dense material, then the range of the intercom really plays a factor. Intercoms that have below 1000 foot range probably won’t be strong enough to penetrate the walls.

To see available door intercoms for churches click here .  IntercomsOnline.com has product experts that can help you decide which intercom is right for you.

 

 

 

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MURS Radio

If you’re in the market for a MURS Radio, you’ll want to check out the blog posts below regarding MURS radios and MURS technology. MURS is a license-free technology for use in the United States and is used for two-way radios, base station intercoms, motion detector, and other devices.

MURS Radio

MURS Radio…Multi-Use Radio Service Technology Guide

Military use of MURS Radios

Two-Way Radio Range: How Far Can Two-Way Radios Communicate?

MURS Two-Way Handheld Radio versus MURS 110 Commercial Handheld Two-Way Radio

Extending Range of Your MURS Radio Using An External Antenna

 

 

 

 

 

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Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Intercom and Telephone Mounting Requirements

The American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) specifies many applications that need some form of communication whether it be two-way voice communication or some form of visual indicator. When a telephone or intercom system is required, then the ADA has defined height requirements so people in wheel chairs can easily access the controls.

When a communication system is required, one of the main ADA requirements is how it is positioned regarding its height. The highest operable part should be located no higher than 48-54 inches above the floor depending on  whether the installation location  requires forward reach or allows for side reach as seen in the illustrations below.  Also, objects projecting from walls with their leading edges between 27 in and 80 in above the finished floor should not protrude more than 4 in into walks, halls, corridors, passageways, or aisles.

The ADA requirements are detailed here: ADA Installation Requirements Illustrations

More info about ADA compliance can be found here: Use Wireless Callboxes for ADA Compliance

 

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