January 2011

Application Whitepaper: Multi-Mile Wireless Access Control and Security Devices

For security and access control dealers there are times when sales are lost simply because a customer doesn’t have the budget to pay for the costly installation required to implement a wired system. Or the customer may not even be able to run wires in buildings with historical significance, or across paved areas outdoors.

For pre-existing construction the installation of security and access control devices at building and property entry points can be a challenge. Trenching for outside cabling and routing cable through walls and ceilings of buildings is both messy and expensive.

The use of long-range wireless access control and security devices make installation much easier and therefore much less expensive to install. Using these wireless devices, access problems can be quickly solved in as little as a single day.  Installation consists of locating the proper location for a device, mounting it on a pole or wall, and providing power either via an electrical outlet, batteries, or solar power.

These devices consist of wireless base station intercoms and handheld two way radios, wireless call boxes with remote gate opening and keypad capability, long distance motion and vehicle proximity sensors, and there are even wireless public address and remote switch monitoring devices that can work with this system.  All devices can communicate at ranges of up to a mile or more with use
of external antennas. No FCC license is required, however many devices can also be programmed to work with existing licensed two-way radios.

One of the best benefits of these products is that they not only eliminate the expensive wiring, but they give mobility to monitoring personnel. Personnel no longer have to be tied to a desk to receive calls and alert notices. That means they can be more productive.

These wireless devices are not for use where more complex devices such as networked proximity or biometric card readers are needed, however, if simple, long-range two-way communications and remote gate/door opening with keypad entry will suffice, these solutions work well.

To read the rest of this free whitepaper, right click on the following link and click on “Save Link As” to save it to your computer’s hard drive.



Wireless Access Control

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OSHA Employee Alarm System

 

Quickly Implement A Wireless System For A Fraction Of The Cost Of A Wired System.

Meeting the compliance requirements of  Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) standards can be a very costly endeavor, but one company found a way to save tens of thousands of dollars on part of these standards.

The world’s leading chemical company, saved money implementing OSHA’s Employee Alarm System standard 29 CFR 1910.165. According to the standard, “An employee alarm system can be any piece of equipment and/or device designed to inform employees that an emergency exists or to signal the presence of a hazard requiring urgent attention.”Emergency Evacuation System

This company looked at a wired system and got a quote for about $70,000 to install the system. Installing this wired system would have required running thousands of feet of wire and the labor cost alone was over $40,000.

They instead turned their focus to a wireless solution. What they discovered is that not only is the cost of a wireless system far less, but they could install the system in as little as a day or two.

The cost of the wireless equipment they needed was less than $12,000 versus the $70K for a wired system. They installed the system themselves so installation cost was also greatly reduced. The result was over $50K in savings.

The heart of their system is the MURS Wireless PA (public address) system that is placed around various locations of their building and property. This is what enables personnel to broadcast an emergency message without having to run wires everywhere.

The PA system consists of a receiver unit with antenna that receives transmissions, amplifies them, and then sends them to attached PA horn speakers. Each receiver location can be set to different volume levels depending on the environment around them.

To activate this emergency notification system, there are a couple of options available. For one, the transmitter sending the message can be in the form of a portable 2-way radio, mobile vehicle radio, or base station intercom that can be used to make live voice announcements from anywhere. These announcements can be used to make guided evacuations or to tell employees to take cover if bad weather is approaching.

The second option is to use a device called the MURS Voice Notification Wireless Monitor that broadcasts a previously recorded message when someone presses a button. Two messages can be recorded with two separate buttons to activate them.

Another benefit of a wireless PA system over a wired system is that handheld two-way radios can be used to make announcements. So no matter where emergency personnel are, they can make announcements. Even if they are up to two miles away or more with the use of external antennas. If a wired PA system is already in place, a Wireless PA System Interface device is available that will receive transmissions from radios and then broadcast those transmissions over a wired PA system.

These wireless PA units are available in both UHF and VHF frequencies so they can be used with existing two-way radios. The MURS model has five frequencies that do not require an FCC license.

One more benefit of a wireless system is that the VHF MURS Wireless PA version of these units can also be programmed to receive automatic transmissions from NOAA Weather Radio so employees instantly know when bad weather is approaching.

So when this company needed to implement an employee emergency evacuation system, they went to www.IntercomsOnline.com to purchase a wireless system that could be quickly installed without all the hassles and expense of installing a wired system.

See also:  OSHA Emergency Evacuation System Cost Savings

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Security and Access Control Dealers Increase Sales By Offering Long-Range Wireless Communication and Remote Entry Opening Devices.

January 19, 2011, Nashville, TN – IntercomsOnline.com has released new application bulletins on their website that help security system and access control dealers make more sales in applications where long range wireless voice communication and remote entry point opening are needed.

For pre-existing construction the installation of access control devices at building and property entry points can be a challenge. Trenching for outside cabling and routing cable through walls and ceilings of buildings is messy and expensive.

The use of long-range wireless access control devices make installation much easier and therefore much less expensive to install. Using these wireless devices, access problems can be quickly solved in as soon as a single day.  Installation consists of locating the proper location for a device, mounting it on a pole or wall, and providing power either via an electrical outlet, batteries, or solar power.

These devices consist of wireless base station intercoms and handheld two way radios, wireless call boxes with remote gate opening and keypad capability, and there are even wireless public address and remote switch monitoring devices that can work with this system.  All devices can communicate at ranges of up to a mile or more with use of external antennas. No FCC license is required, however many devices can be programmed to work with existing licensed two-way radios.

Says IntercomsOnline.com marketing director David Onslow, “One of the best benefits of these products is that they not only eliminate the expensive wiring, but they give mobility to monitoring personnel. Personnel no longer have to be tied to a desk to receive calls and alert notices. That means they can be more productive.”

These wireless devices are not for use where more complex devices such as networked proximity or biometric card readers are needed, however, if simple, long-range two-way communications and remote gate/door opening with keypad entry will suffice, these solutions work well.

These new bulletins are available at: http://www.IntercomsOnline.com/bulletins

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IntercomsOnline.com solves communication problems in homes and businesses. Their  ecommerce store specializes in intercoms, wireless intercom systems, two way radios, wireless call boxes, and other communication devices. Through 20 years of product expertise in communication systems, they have been able to simplify the ordering of otherwise complex assemblies. Their site has ample product information needed to make an informed buying decision. Go to www.IntercomsOnline.com for more information.

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Door Intercom

When shopping for a door intercom system the first question to ask is whether or not you can run wires between the door and the inside area where you want a monitor intercom. If you need multiple indoor intercoms, can you also run wires between those areas (the wires don’t all go back to the door, but run between inside stations)? If you are looking at a wired system, don’t forget to factor in the cost of the installation when calculating the total cost of the system. The cost of installing the wire can be even more than the system itself. If you decide on a wireless door intercom, installation is usually fairly simple and low cost.

If you choose a wireless door intercom then you need to be concerned about factors like the distance between the inside and outside stations and anything that may interfere with the signal. If a building is metal or concrete, the signal may not pass through the walls. If there are other electrical or wireless devices they could also interfere with the signal. Some of the commercial-type intercoms have greater signal strength and can use an external antenna that can help solve some of these issues.

Another issue to be aware of is privacy. If you need the calls between the front door intercom and the inside unit to be private, then a wired system is best. However,  the WireFree Wireless Intercom is a digital system that has built-in digital security that keeps others from hearing the conversation.

Another question to ask is whether or not you want to remotely unlock the door or whether you plan to walk to the door and let people in. The WireFree system does not have that capability, but the most other intercoms do as long as you have some sort of electric door strike installed.

If the person who will be answering the door is mobile, you’ll need a wireless system so that person can carry a handheld radio.

A door intercom can also have video capability so you can see who is at the door as well as talk to them.

IntercomsOnline.com has a variety of door intercoms your you to choose from.

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Chamberlain Wireless Intercom Programming Instructions

Purchasers of the Chamberlain wireless intercoms often have trouble programming them using the programming instructions that come with those wireless intercoms. The following enhanced instructions are courtesy of IntercomsOnline.com and users usually have much better success with them.
For Initial Intercom Programming

  1. After putting batteries in the intercoms, find the “Learn” button on them. Look at the pictures below to see where they are on the two available intercom styles.
  2. Clear the memory on all intercoms. You do that by holding down the Learn button until you hear a beep and then continue holding until you hear a second beep. Then you let go of the Learn button.
  3. Set two intercoms side by side. Press the Learn button on one intercom until you hear a beep and then release it. Within 10 seconds do the same on the second intercom. On the indoor intercoms the blue lights on the front will flash in a scanning pattern. When the scanning quits the programming is done. The intercom should emit a tone after they are programmed, but they don’t always do this.
  4. Allow about 20 seconds after the Learn procedure if you have an outdoor style intercom since it does not have lights to tell you when programming is done.
  5. Now press the Talk button on one intercom and see if they work. If the volume is turned up, you will get a squealing noise if the intercoms are close together. This is normal feedback and it won’t occur when the intercoms are separated.


To Program More Than Two Intercoms

  1. After you have cleared the memory on the unit you want to add using the procedure above, take one of the programmed intercoms and set it next to one of the additional intercoms you want to program in your network.
  2. Press the Learn button on the new intercom and release it after you hear a beep.
  3. Within 10 seconds, press the Learn button on the intercom that is already programmed in your network and then release it.
  4. Test the intercoms together and they should now work.

If you want to add on to your wireless intercom system, click here

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Office Intercom System

When looking for an office intercom system, the first question is do you need a wireless intercom or a wired intercom. To make that decision, you can start by answering the following questions:

1. Can you run wires?

Of course a wireless system is much easier to install since you don’t have to pull wire through the walls and ceilings of your office. But a wireless system doesn’t give you all the same capabilities as a wired system as you’ll discover in the next questions.

2. Do you need a baby monitor-like feature to monitor an area?

This is where a wired intercom system works better. There is one wireless system that does have monitor capability, but it’s not quite as clear as a wired system. There are wired intercoms that do this well if you only need to monitor one area at a time.

3. Do you need to call individual areas or broadcast to all areas?

If you need to broadcast to all areas, either wired or wireless can work for you. If you need to call individual areas, then a wired intercom system works best.  Wireless systems work well for calling all areas at once, but you can’t call an individual station unless it’s on a separate channel. The downside of setting up everyone on separate channels is if someone leaves their channel to talk to someone else and then doesn’t go back to their channel, you won’t be able to reach them. There is one digital wireless intercom that at least sets up a private conversation between you and whomever answers the page over all the intercoms.

A wired intercom has push buttons to select individual sub-station intercoms from the master station, however if you need to call in between individual sub stations then you have to start running cables with lots of pairs of wires. If that’s what you need, you really need a telephone system and not an intercom system.

4. Do your people need to answer calls while they are mobile?

If you need people to answer an intercom call no matter where they are, then wireless is your only choice.  You can get an intercom system that uses a handheld two-way radio so no matter where employees are, they can be reached.

If you answer those questions first, you’re well on your way to figuring out which office intercom system is right for you. The product experts at IntercomsOnline.com will help you with any other questions you have.

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Wireless Emergency Warning System

Low-Cost Solution Is The Missing Element to Campus-Wide Emergency Warning Systems

When an emergency occurs on a university or business campus, getting the word out quickly could save lives. While many of these campus environments may already have some type of warning system installed, they are often missing a critical element of an emergency warning system.Wireless Warning System

Campus emergency notification systems often send text or verbal messages to cell phones, but not everyone carries them, has them turned on, or is paying attention to them. So these devices can’t be relied on solely.

Plus there is a time lag while a person enters the message into the system, and a delay in the time the last person receives the message. That delay could be 20 to 40 minutes or more if someone isn’t checking their messages. If an off-site hosted system is used, delays can even be higher.

Sirens are also usually used to alert people of an emergency, but a siren can’t tell people what type of an emergency it is. Besides that, people are so used to hearing sirens they can have trouble distinguishing a campus warning siren from one use by police, fire, ambulance or even car alarms.

The missing element of many warning systems is a verbal announcement that tells people exactly what the emergency is and what to do about it. The cost of implementing such a system is often prohibitive due to the high cost of running wires to install it.

This is where the use of a wireless pubic address (PA) system in conjunction with existing two-way radios can fit the need. Not only does a wireless PA system eliminate the need for expensive wiring, it also allows security personnel to make announcements no matter where they are. They can be at the scene of an emergency and give immediate updates.

A wireless PA system consists of a long-range receiver unit with antenna that receives transmissions from a mobile or desktop two-way radio, amplifies them, and then sends them to attached PA horn speakers.

The wireless PA is available in UHF and VHF frequencies and can be programmed to work with existing campus two-way radios.Wireless Emergency Warning System Bulletin

These units strategically placed across a campus enable security personnel to quickly broadcast clear emergency messages and live updates. These real time messages reduce the calls to emergency response personnel who are too busy to be handling dozen of calls from people looking for more information.

If broadcast pre-recorded messages are needed, the Wireless PA system can also be used in conjunction with a Voice Notification Wireless Monitor device, which is a wireless radio transmitter that reports changes in the status of switches connected to it. When a switch is closed, it transmits a  user-recorded voice message to the PA system. It can be used for messages triggered by some device, or a button can be connected to it for manually activated pre-recorded messages.

So whether a natural or man-made disaster occurs such as a tornado or terrorist act, an inexpensive add-on wireless PA system makes sense when an immediate emergency response is needed from a large number of people.

These units can be purchased at www.IntercomsOnline.com

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